Author Topic: The Anthropocentric View Of The Environmentalists  (Read 4455 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TCU

  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
    • The Wit and Wisdom of Cancer by Nina Paley
...Only One Solution {"MAN" by Steve Cutts}

Please feel free to send along editorial suggestions or report broken links. We're about success.

Offline TCU

  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
    • The Wit and Wisdom of Cancer by Nina Paley
Re: The Anthropocentric View Of The Environmentalists
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2013, 05:25:41 PM »
Re-Wilding Projects
There exists numerous projects in the US commonly referred to as "re-wilding". Sounds interesting doesn't it?

Examples :

http://www.twp.org/about-us/faq
http://www.wildlandsnetwork.org/about-us/faq
http://rewilding.org/rewildit/our-programs/population-growth/

Now observe several quotes from these re-wilding projects. See if you notice a parallel?

Quote
Q11: Will protected areas in wildlands networks be off-limits to humans?

A11: No. New or existing federally protected areas within Wildlands Network Designs (WNDs) will always be accessible to humans for a wide range of activities including hiking, primitive camping, nature study, photography, and wildlife viewing. Sustainable hunting and fishing opportunities, as well as certain levels of grazing, will also remain available where permitted under existing laws.

Quote
Although Soulè and Noss state, “Our principal premise is that rewilding is a critical step in restoring self-regulating land communities,” they claim two non-scientific justifications: (1) “the ethical issue of human responsibility,” and (2) “the subjective, emotional essence of ‘the wild’ or wilderness. Wilderness is hardly ‘wild’ where top carnivores, such as cougars, jaguars, wolves, wolverines, grizzlies, or black bears have been extirpated. Without these components, nature seems somehow incomplete, truncated, overly tame. Human opportunities to attain humility are reduced.”

Quote
He has worked with Patagonia Company on their Vote Environment campaign, the Sierra Club’s hunter-angler outreach campaign, Green Corps, the Wild Farm Alliance, and other activist groups fighting the industrialization of our wildlands. Other Fellows do similar work. Fellows also serve on boards of directors and advisory boards for dozens of on-the-ground conservation groups.

Quote
A focus of TRI’s outreach and education program is finding nontraditional allies for continental-scale conservation. The Zoo-TRI effort is the best example of not speaking to the choir. In addition, Dave Foreman and Conservation Fellow John Davis are working with the Wild Farm Alliance to integrate continental-scale conservation approaches into farming and ranching with the wild. Dave Foreman is working with the Sierra Club on bringing hunters and fishers together with other conservationists (Fellow Bart Semcer runs this Sierra Club program). Fellows are also working with professional wildlife and wildlands staff in state and federal agencies. By consciously reaching out beyond conservation activists, The Rewilding Institute hopes to educate and activate larger parts of society to get behind rewilding North America.

Quote
I am convinced that we conservationists will be more successful only if we have a positive vision to work toward, and if we are buoyed by hope.  Hope is essential. Without it, conservationists and the public we wish to convince become distraught, depressed, and without the energy and will to defend wild Nature.  Without a vision, we are merely parrying attacks, with no sense of what we are working for, and with no strategy of how to get there.

Does anyone else spot a certain degree of "schizophrenia" inherent in that last quote? After all, many "conservationists" are serial killers themselves operating under the flag of "hope for nature". What about the public...aren't they the "hopeful" people who say : "Well, so what if a species on earth becomes extinct? How will that affect my income? There will still be burgers won't there?". Do the public make any effort to adopt environmental lifestyles even in the face of their own extinction? Do the public adopt the plant based diet in face of their own ethical responsibilities? Do the public have hope for all the other species on earth while they're funding fast food burger bars and their ranches?

... Please continue, we could go on all night long with this list. I'm not certain if it's even funny or tragic any-more.

It's time to acknowledge that the human race will not lift a finger to support any efforts that are not directly profitable to their present short-sighted economic regime. Humanity feeds wild herbivore populations only in order to conduct sports hunting...that's about as close to "conservation" as humanity will ever come. If carnivores are introduced into these little "conservation areas" then that will be done solely in order to solicit funds for trophy hunting intended to "compensate" for the herbivores (owned by humanity) lost to the introduced carnivores (owned by humanity).

Earth has become one great canned hunt at worst or "managed" prison camp at best. If you belong to any other species you are under constant surveillance via GPS radio collars and hysterical zoophobic public reporting. You will be shot on sight for (fun) straying beyond restricted political boundaries that you aren't even made aware of. Every species on earth, wild or not, is human property and/or an economic resource. Nothing more than a potential slave, potential meat, potential sport, potential profit.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 05:52:19 PM by TCU »
...Only One Solution {"MAN" by Steve Cutts}

Please feel free to send along editorial suggestions or report broken links. We're about success.

Offline Deadly virus

  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: The Anthropocentric View Of The Environmentalists
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2013, 07:14:49 AM »
Actually I’m not sure this organization fits the type the article  (on which the thread’s name is based) tries to confront. I say this cause even without getting into speculations of the fate of lands about to be privatized (as this organization absurdly suggests) or into the principle idea stating that lands can be owned and managed by private people. their anthropocentric view doesn’t need to be exposed as it couldn’t be more out there. There’s no doubt what's animals place in the universe, according to them- hung on a fishing hook or through rifle scopes…

The article aims to expose that behind the environmentalists approach stands a very anthropocentric worldview. Environmentalists that consume animals based products were criticized for their double standards, hypocrisy and inconsequence. But with the case here there’s nothing to expose- that’s how much they’re far behind. While the animal rights movement expect them to at least ban factory farms for their enormous environmental harm, these assholes are suggesting privatizing lands which are supposed to be commons and offer them for camping (along with the rubbish, noise and light pollution and taking over of habitats) and of course hunting and fishing.

Offline E.A.S

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 182
    • View Profile
Re: The Anthropocentric View Of The Environmentalists
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2013, 04:56:07 AM »
The anthropocentric environmentalists from The Anthropocentric View Of The Environmentalists are far from being at the bottom of the ones which there’s at least some expectations of.
Obviously, it's just another reminder of how horrible things are and how the road is not long but absolutely hopeless. 

Offline TCU

  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
    • The Wit and Wisdom of Cancer by Nina Paley
Re: The Anthropocentric View Of The Environmentalists
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2013, 03:35:58 PM »
Kofa National Wildlife Refuge

Quote
The Kofa National Wildlife Refuge is located northeast of Yuma, Arizona, southeast of Quartzsite, Arizona, in the southwestern United States. The refuge, established in 1939 to protect Desert Bighorn Sheep, encompasses over 665,400 acres (2,693 km2) of the Yuma Desert region of the Sonoran Desert. Broad, gently sloping foothills as well as the sharp, needlepoint peaks of the Kofa Mountains are found in the rugged refuge. The small, widely scattered waterholes attract a surprising number of water birds for a desert area. A wide variety of plant life is also found throughout the refuge.

Quote
In 1936, the Arizona Boy Scouts mounted a state-wide campaign to save the Bighorn Sheep, leading to the creation of Kofa. The Scouts first became interested in the sheep through the efforts of Major Frederick Russell Burnham, the noted conservationist who has been called the "Father of Scouting." Burnham observed that fewer than 150 of these sheep lived in the Arizona mountains. He called George F. Miller, then scout executive of the Boy Scout council headquartered in Phoenix, with a plan to save the sheep. Burnham put it this way:

    I want you to save this majestic animal, not only because it is in danger of extinction, but of more importance, some day it might provide domestic sheep with a strain to save them from disaster at the hands of a yet unknown virus.

Quote
Regulated hunting on the refuge is permitted for quail, bighorn sheep, deer, cottontail rabbit, coyote, and fox.
...Only One Solution {"MAN" by Steve Cutts}

Please feel free to send along editorial suggestions or report broken links. We're about success.

 

TinyPortal © 2005-2015